Review: “The Woman In Cabin 10” by Ruth Ware

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From New York Times bestselling author of the “twisty-mystery” (Vulture) novel In a Dark, Dark Wood, comes The Woman in Cabin 10, an equally suspenseful novel from Ruth Ware—this time, set at sea.

In this tightly wound story, Lo Blacklock, a journalist who writes for a travel magazine, has just been given the assignment of a lifetime: a week on a luxury cruise with only a handful of cabins. At first, Lo’s stay is nothing but pleasant: the cabins are plush, the dinner parties are sparkling, and the guests are elegant. But as the week wears on, frigid winds whip the deck, gray skies fall, and Lo witnesses what she can only describe as a nightmare: a woman being thrown overboard. The problem? All passengers remain accounted for—and so, the ship sails on as if nothing has happened, despite Lo’s desperate attempts to convey that something (or someone) has gone terribly, terribly wrong…

With surprising twists and a setting that proves as uncomfortably claustrophobic as it is eerily beautiful, Ruth Ware offers up another intense read. Continue reading

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Review:”Night Train To Berlin”by Margaret de Rohan

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‘Are you going to Scarborough Fair?’

This is the question a stranger asks a woman at Les Invalides in Paris. She spontaneously responds with the next line of the English folk song, and the man walks away without a further word.

Ten minutes later he is seriously injured in a hit-and-run incident nearby which witnesses say looked deliberate. Who is this man? Why does he seem fixated on something due to happen in Berlin on the 15th March: the Ides of March about which Julius Caesar was warned prior to his assassination in 44BC? And what is the connection with the Scarborough Fair folk song and Simon and Garfunkel in New York in 1985?

The woman’s husband, Chief Inspector Philippe Maigret of the Police Nationale de Paris, fears that what the man said was the mistaken approach of a spy – or a terrorist – and that his wife’s life is now in danger. Who was this man’s real contact? And why was he being followed by someone with links to a Middle Eastern country’s security services? When his wife and grandson disappear from the overnight train from Paris to Berlin less than a week later, Chief Inspector Maigret steps up his investigation with the help of Chief Inspector Clive Scott from Scotland Yard and they race through Europe to get their answers in a new Jaguar ‘borrowed’ from the British Embassy in Paris…

Can Scarborough Fair really be in Berlin? And can it take place on the Ides of March? All will be revealed in this gripping thriller that will appeal to lovers of suspense and Francophiles alike. Continue reading

Review: Audiobook “The Girl On The Train” by Paula Hawkins

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EVERY DAY THE SAME
Rachel takes the same commuter train every morning and night. Every day she rattles down the track, flashes past a stretch of cozy suburban homes, and stops at the signal that allows her to daily watch the same couple breakfasting on their deck. She’s even started to feel like she knows them. Jess and Jason, she calls them. Their life—as she sees it—is perfect. Not unlike the life she recently lost.

UNTIL TODAY
And then she sees something shocking. It’s only a minute until the train moves on, but it’s enough. Now everything’s changed. Unable to keep it to herself, Rachel goes to the police. But is she really as unreliable as they say? Soon she is deeply entangled not only in the investigation but in the lives of everyone involved. Has she done more harm than good? Continue reading